'Someone They Knew With Tamron Hall' Returns Sunday, Feb. 19

Court TV, the popular multi-platform network devoted to live, gavel-to-gavel coverage, in-depth legal reporting and expert analysis of the nation’s most important and compelling trials and crime stories, announced today that its hit true-crime series, “Someone They Knew With Tamron Hall,” will return for its second season on Sunday, Feb. 19 at 9 p.m. ET/8 p.m. CT, with the first of 24 new episodes to be seen Sunday nights.

Hosted by Daytime Emmy Award-winning TV host, journalist and author Tamron Hall, this true-crime series follows the path from victim to verdict and explores how, when it comes to murder, it is rare for there to be no prior connection between the killer and the deceased.

No voice-overs, no reporters and no correspondents, the stories are told from the point of view of the people impacted by the case, including the lawyers, jurors, members of law enforcement and the victim’s family and friends. Utilizing new interviews, archival footage and re-creations of the crime, the goal of each episode is an unbiased 360-degree balanced story.

“Season one of ‘Someone They Knew’ quickly became a staple among Court TV’s unparalleled coverage of the hottest, most compelling and complex court cases of our time,” said Ethan Nelson, head of Court TV. “For season two, viewers can expect more of these fascinating cases with 24 new and intriguing true crime stories.”

“I have always been pulled into the ‘why’ – why crimes like this happen, and the distressing impact they bring to family, friends and loved ones,” said Hall. “It’s because of this that returning for season two is so personally important to me. I know I speak for the entire ‘Someone They Knew’ team when I say that we can’t wait to bring more of these stories to Court TV viewers.”

Among the second season cases:

  • “Burning Jealousy” (Georgia v. Davis): David Coffin’s house burned down with him in it, but it wasn’t the fire that killed him. It was the bullet in his head. Investigators immediately focused on Scott Davis, the estranged husband of Coffin’s new girlfriend. But Davis said that someone had tried to burn down his house that same night. Was Davis spinning tales, or was someone out to get them both?
  • “Student Body” (South Carolina v. Richardson): In 2001, University of South Carolina student Shelton Sanders disappeared while planning a friend’s bachelor party. He was never seen again. When evidence leads to an arrest, however, prosecutors are left with a tall task: how do you prove a murder if you don’t have a body?
  • “Mommy Dearest” (Florida v. Cooney): Divorce wasn’t enough to end the animosity between James and Linda Cooney. The bitterness continued until Linda shot James dead with a .357 Magnum. She claimed self-defense. The only witness: their 10-year-old son. His testimony would determine his mother’s fate, and his own.
  • “A Hit with a Bullet” (Tennessee v. D’Antonio): It’s not easy to score a successful song in Nashville – what they called “a bullet.” Sometimes what it takes is a little more than talent and a little less than legal. Kevin Hughes caught a different kind of bullet. 12 years later, investigators uncovered the conspiracy that killed him.
  • “Ten Years After” (Massachusetts v. Hilton): When a fire breaks out in Krystina Sutherland’s apartment building, the first suspect is her ex-boyfriend, Charles Loayza. After all, he had threatened to burn it down earlier that day. But Loayza had an airtight alibi, and witnesses saw a different face: Loayza’s mother, Kathleen Hilton. What could have sparked her ire, and why did she spend ten years to get to trial?

Hall is the host and executive producer of the award-winning daytime television show “Tamron Hall,” which is produced and distributed in national syndication by Walt Disney Television. For her work on the show’s first season, Hall won the Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Informative Talk Show Host. “Tamron Hall” was also awarded the prestigious Gracie Award in its first season, which recognizes exemplary programming created by women. In October 2021, Hall released her first novel, “As The Wicked Watch” – the first in a thrilling new crime series.

About Court TV
Court TV (@CourtTV) is devoted to live gavel-to-gavel coverage, in-depth legal reporting, and expert analysis of the nation’s most important and compelling trials. The network is available to 97% of U.S. television homes free and over the air via digital antenna, on cable, on mobile with the Court TV app and online at CourtTV.com. It is also carried on connected TVs, including Samsung TV Plus and Vizio, and an expanding array of streaming services and apps, including YouTube TV, SiriusXM, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Pluto TV, Apple TV, Sling and Uma. Court TV is part of The E.W. Scripps Company (NASDAQ: SSP).

SOURCE Court TV

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